first_imgMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the census One of the reasons for that is because “television crime shows have a big impact on what people believe about the power of these tools.”Denmark, of course, differs from the United States in many respects.But Doleac’s study of U.S. DNA databases also found that they produce sharp drops in criminal reoffending.Her U.S. work further notes that deterring a crime via DNA databases costs less than 10 percent of the cost of producing the same deterrent effect by building more prisons.And because DNA-related technology is getting cheaper every year while prisons remain as costly as ever, that favorable cost-effectiveness ratio is only going to rise.Keith Humphreys is a professor of psychiatry at Stanford University. In some countries, such databases also sometimes include a DNA sample, typically obtained from saliva.When the government of Denmark increased the proportion of arrestees from whom police gathered DNA samples from 4 percent to 40 percent in just five months, a research team took advantage of the natural experiment to evaluate whether DNA databases reduce crime.In a study of more than 38,000 males who were arrested for crimes roughly equivalent in severity to felonies in the United States, the research team found that being added to the DNA database reduced reoffending by a stunning 43 percent.The harsher criminal sentences that are favored by self-styled “tough on crime” politicians have shown no evidence of producing a comparable level of crime reduction.Because DNA evidence is found at many crime scenes (e.g., most rapes and other violent assaults), DNA databases raise the odds that the offender will be identified and convicted.As has been shown in many other criminal justice programs, raising the likelihood of being punished deters repeat offending far more than does increasing the severity of criminal penalties.Study team member Jennifer Doleac of the University of Virginia said that even uneducated offenders who don’t fully understand what DNA is nonetheless are deterred from recidivism after being added to the database.center_img Categories: Editorial, OpinionElected officials often push for lengthening prison sentences for particular crimes in the hopes of deterring people from committing them.But new research highlights a more effective and less costly approach: expanding databases that record the DNA of criminal offenders.Law enforcement agencies have long maintained databases of convicted criminals’ fingerprints and mug shots.Such records help police solve the many crimes that are committed by people with a criminal history.last_img read more


first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionRegardless of your political views on abortion, guns, gay rights, religion, climate change or immigration: If you claim to be an American, what more do you need to know about the threat to U.S. democracy, other than President Trump, along with the West Wing and the vast majority of his cronies, give more credence to Russian claims than they do to findings of the FBI and the CIA.Louis Restifo Sr.SchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady man dies following Cutler Street dirt bike crashFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Motorcyclist injured in Thursday afternoon Schenectady crashlast_img read more


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first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img


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first_imgAt the port, officials could be seen dressed in white full-body protective suits, complete with face masks and helmets.As the massive cruise ship docked, passengers who have been told they may have to stay aboard for 14 days even if they test negative for the virus, came out onto balconies, some waving to assembled media or taking pictures.People on board have described confusion and boredom after being confined to cabins following the decision by Japanese authorities to quarantine the vessel.More than 20 countries have confirmed cases of the virus, which has infected more than 28,000 in mainland China and killed more than 560 people. The outbreak has prompted the World Health Organization to declare a global health emergency, several governments to impose travel restrictions, and airlines to suspend flights to and from China.Japan has now confirmed 25 cases of the new coronavirus — excluding the cruise ship infections — among them citizens returning from Wuhan, the Chinese city at the centre of the outbreak.Tokyo has evacuated more than 500 Japanese citizens from Wuhan, and attracted some criticism for its relatively loose quarantine approach.There have been several incidences of apparent person-to-person transmission in Japan, including a tour guide and bus driver who contracted the virus after coming into contact with visitors from Wuhan.Neither had visited China in recent months.Topics : Ten more people on a cruise ship off Japan have tested positive for the new coronavirus, local media said Thursday, raising the number of infections detected on the boat to 20.Japanese authorities have tested 273 people among the approximately 3,700 passengers and crew on the ship after a man who got off the boat last month in Hong Kong tested positive for the new strain.The new cases were reported as the Diamond Princess, which was placed in quarantine off the Japanese port city of Yokohama on Monday night, docked to allow resupply and the removal of sick passengers.last_img read more


first_imgWith the pain that lingers on his right foot, the rider forced himself to compete at the 2020 National Championship on Friday “My coaches didn’t let me play. And the doctor agreed. But I felt like I really needed to compete I told them that I [just] needed something to minimize the pain,” he told journalists in Jakarta.“During practice, I already felt the pain. I consulted with the doctor again, asking him to give a strong painkiller, and he gave me medicine that was safe to take,” he added.What Bagus did might sound unreasonable for some as it could lead to much worse injury but the rider knows that the points offered in the championship would increase his individual points and that of the country for Olympic qualification. Topics : For an athlete, getting a chance to compete in a world-class sporting event such as the Olympic Games is a dream come true. To realize the dream, many are willing to sacrifice everything, as it is an opportunity of a lifetime.BMX rider I Gusti Bagus Saputra’s desire to compete in the Tokyo Olympics in July and August is huge. Bagus is willing to go the extra mile, including by battling with physical pain since early February.Bagus sustained an injury to his right ankle after falling during a practice session at the BMX Supercross World Cup in Shepparton, Australia, on Feb. 1 to 2. The injury prevented him from being able to give his best, as he finished in 117thplace among 135 riders competing in the tournament.center_img Bagus, who hails from West Nusa Tenggara, surprisingly finished first in the final held at the Jakarta International BMX Track in Pulo Mas, East Jakarta, advancing Toni Syarifudin, a Rio Olympics participant, who finished second.“I’m very grateful for winning, despite my body not being 100 percent fit. I fell during the Australian event. The doctor [told me] that there was [a possibility] of a tear in the muscle,” he said after winning the championship.“But I told the doctor that I was determined to win the competition to collect more points for the Olympic qualification.”After finishing Friday’s race, Bagus did look like he was in pain, as he was limping. “My muscles are in good condition but I still need to undergo thorough examination. If in one week I still feel the pain, [the doctor] told me that I would need to see a physiotherapist [immediately],” the 27-year-old athlete said, while pointing at his bruised right ankle.“I will keep trying to do my best. If I can still take part in [future] competitions, I will try my best,” he added.   Bagus, who won silver at the 2018 Asian Games, is the country’s highest ranking BMX rider, ranked the world’s number 48 rider, trailed by Rio Akbar at 56th position.Indonesia aims to send one representative in the men’s elite category of BMX racing to the Tokyo Olympics. According to rules, a country can send a rider to Tokyo if it stands in sixth to 11th place in the world rankings as of June 2 when the qualification period closes. As of February, Indonesia is still crawling at world number 19.According to the national cycling team’s physician, Andika Respati, Bagus might have a problem in his ligament, as it might be torn, as well as in his tendon.“After we conducted an X-ray, Alhamdulillah [praise God] there was no problem with his bone. A condition like that endured by Bagus might need four to six weeks to recover but it depends on the therapy program. We will be selective in choosing [future] tournaments for Bagus,” he said, referring to the level of prestige of the tournaments.“The recovery would also depend on how obedient Bagus is in following the therapy program designed for him,” he added.Meanwhile, national team coach Dadang Haries Poernomo said the team was scheduled to compete in six tournaments during the qualification period, including Banyuwangi International BMX in East Java and Asian BMX Championship in Jakarta. Both aforementioned tournaments will be held in April.“Later, we will evaluate which riders had the best results. We all agreed that we will send the top representative [to Tokyo],” he said.last_img read more


first_imgThe factory sentiment data shows how the virus is rippling through the region, disrupting supply chains and depressing demand. Travel restrictions are rampant, schools and businesses in pockets of the region are shuttered and governments are scrambling to provide stimulus to shore up their economies.China’s official PMI plunged in February to a record-low 35.7 from 50 at the start of the year, according to data released Saturday. The big decline signals a worse-than-expected first-quarter contraction, with Nomura Holdings Inc. economists led by Lu Ting projecting the economy shrank 2.5 percent in the first three months of the year from the previous period.Global markets have been roiled by virus fears, with equities and bond yields sliding on Monday as investors digested the PMI data. Japanese stocks opened 1.3 percent lower, and S&P 500 futures slumped over 1 percent, with a signal from the Federal Reserve Friday that it’s open to easing policy providing little comfort.Read also: Asian stock markets reverse losses on global policy stimulus hopes Asia’s factories took a tumble in February under the weight of the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak, with a severe plunge in activity in China driving down output across the region.South Korea and Japan, where confirmed cases of the virus have accelerated recently, showed sharp declines in production, according to purchasing manager surveys released by IHS Markit on Monday. South Korea’s PMI, a critical bellwether of global demand, dropped to a four-month low of 48.7 from 49.8 in January, while the Jibun Bank Japan index declined to 47.8, the lowest reading since May 2016.Taiwan dropped below 50, the dividing line between expansion and contraction, while Thailand and Malaysia stayed in that territory. Vietnam’s PMI fell to a more than six-year low of 49. Indonesia was a lone bright spot in the regional data, seeing its PMI gauge rise to 51.9, its first reading in expansion since June. Southeast Asia’s biggest economy has registered no official coronavirus cases amid concern that testing hasn’t been vigorous enough.Disruption to manufacturing has been evident across the region as companies take steps to stop the virus from spreading.A Hyundai Motor Co. plant in South Korea last week halted operations after a worker was confirmed to have been infected. Samsung Electronics Co. also temporarily stopped output at one its plants last month after an employee tested positive for the disease.China’s economy is gradually returning to work with activity likely running at 60 percent to 70 percent capacity last week, according to a Bloomberg Economics report, up from about 50 percent two weeks ago.South Korea has been particularly hard-hit over the past two weeks as virus cases surged above 3,500.The Bank of Korea refrained from cutting interest rates when it met last week, opting instead to extend inexpensive loans to small businesses and leaving it for the government to take broader action.South Korea’s manufacturers and exporters will likely remain under pressure, said Joe Hayes, an economist at IHS Markit.“Even if demand does recover, day-to-day operations are likely to suffer as firms seek alternative suppliers or operate below capacity until normality across supply chains is restored,” he said.Topics :last_img read more


first_imgState-owned lender Bank Mandiri is giving out life insurance plans with potential payments totaling Rp 1 trillion (US$60 million) to 35,000 frontline healthcare professionals fighting the COVID-19 pandemic in the country.Bank Mandiri president director Royke Tumilaar said doctors would receive life insurance plans of Rp 50 million and nurses would receive plans of Rp 25 million. Other medical professionals would receive plans of Rp 10 million per person. The insurance will be channeled through AXA Mandiri Financial Services.He said that the insurance would be available for one year, from April 1 to March 31, 2021. “What we do to stop the spread means nothing compared to their work,” Erick said during the video conference.The effort from Bank Mandiri adds to a government plan to provide financial incentives and protective gear for health workers.The government plans to provide a Rp 15 million incentive to medical specialists, Rp 10 million to physicians and dentists, Rp 7.5 million to nurses and Rp 5 million to other medical staff members, President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo said in March.“We will also provide a total of Rp 300 million of compensation in case of death. This applies to regions that have declared a state of emergency,” Jokowi said.Topics : “We realize that healthcare professionals at the hospitals are working in a high-risk environment, and although the amount is nothing compared to their sacrifice, we hope this protection plan can help ease their burdens,” said Royke during a video conference.The COVID-19 pandemic has put a massive strain on Indonesia’s healthcare system. There are reports of inadequate medical supplies and deaths of hospital workers as patient numbers continue to grow.Read also: Indonesian medical workers threaten to stop COVID-19 treatment if protective gear not providedState-Owned Enterprises (SOEs) Minister Erick Thohir lauded Bank Mandiri’s effort, saying that the medical workers deserved the protection as they were working on the front lines of the pandemic. He said the public needed to work together to face the pandemic and support healthcare workers.last_img read more

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