first_imgSeventeen years ago Jim LaBella, general manager of the Huddle, came up with the concept of a limited-time, late-night special that would offer hot dogs to students for just 25 cents. For a while, everything went smoothly: The “limited-time” special became a staple of Huddle Mart fast food, the Huddle made some money off the sales and Notre Dame had a new thing to boast as tradition. “Then we started losing money,” LaBella said. “We’ve been losing money on every one that we’ve sold for the last five years, basically.”   LaBella said last school year, the Huddle Mart served 29,798 hot dogs and lost eight cents on each one of them. That loss prompted the decision to raise the price to 33 cents per hot dog. “We waited as long as we could,” he said. “Now, at three for 99 cents we’re just breaking even. We’re not making a cent on these.” A departmental decision was made over the summer to raise the price, LaBella said. No other major price changes have been made to Huddle Mart products this year. “We meet departmentally and look at our costs, and then determine what to change,” he said. LaBella said he looks out to protect Notre Dame traditions just as much as students do. That is why the price of the hot dogs had not changed since 1993, he said. The Huddle never promoted the hot dogs as “quarter dogs,” LaBella said. They were simply meant to be a low-cost special offered late at night.   “We never called them quarter dogs — that was a nickname that students gradually took on,” he said.   LaBella does not expect the tradition to change or fade now that the hot dogs cost 33 cents. “We haven’t seen any change in the number of students purchasing the hot dogs this year,” he said. Regardless, students remain dissatisfied with the price raise. For sophomore Brian Phelan, the renaming of quarter dogs as “midnight dogs” just does not cut it. “They should be called third dogs, because before they were a quarter of a dollar — now they’re a third of a dollar,” he said. Freshman Beau Dolan agrees. “It doesn’t really make sense,” he said. “It’s probably two-cent meat and a [half-cent] worth of bread.” Junior Connor Paladino, said that for the eight-cent raise in price, the hot dogs should at least “taste better.” LaBella said the Huddle works to provide value to the students wherever it can, but could not afford to lose more money on the hot dogs. “Three hot dogs for 99 cents is still ridiculously low-priced,” LaBella said with a laugh. “It’s still a heck of deal.”last_img read more


first_imgMathematics Professor Joanne Snow and associate mathematics Professor Colleen Hoover presented “Faith and Reason in the Life and Work of Mathematician Marston Morse” at Saint Mary’s Believing Scholars Lecture Tuesday. As Snow mentioned, the lecture, put on by Saint Mary’s Center for Spirituality, was “a very broad overview of one man’s philosophy of the link between science and religion.” Snow and Hoover addressed many topics, including the development of Morse’s spiritual life, his philosophy that religion supports science and the influence of faith on Morse’s personal and professional life. According to Snow and Hoover, Morse was very prolific, writing many books and articles, serving his country in times of war, raising seven children and on top of that, providing many insights into the field of mathematics. Morse fathered the Morse Theory, helpful in the study of topology of mathematical space, Snow said. Morse was raised as a staunch Baptist until his future wife entered his life. Louise Morse was a Catholic, and refused to marry a non-Catholic. Morse converted, and was a strong advocate of his faith ever since, Snow said. According to Hoover, Morse was not afraid to stand up for his newfound Catholic faith. He was not afraid to correct the misconceptions and false assumptions others had about the Catholic Church. In their lecture, Snow and Hoover argued science and religion do not contradict each other; rather, they complement each other. Morse’s philosophy stated that there is no conflict between science, philosophy and theology, Hoover said. Morse argued that any spark of conflict between these fields would only arise due to misunderstanding of the definition of “science,” Hoover said. Hoover highlighted one of Morse’s many philosophies, which stated that “both religion and science recognize the power and limitations of reason.” “Morse believed that faith is as much needed in science as in religion,” Hoover said. Spirituality’s study of the infinite, Morse argued, greatly complements science. “Recognition of the infinite gives the scientist the humility to make great discoveries,” Hoover said. Snow said Morse believed that “without faith, science lacks the wonder and awe” of discovery. Morse was not a stranger to the Notre Dame community. According to Snow, he knew many influential people, including Einstein and Notre Dame’s own Father Hesburgh. Morse was consulted in the renovation of the Notre Dame math department, and he donated many books to the Hesburgh Library, Despite already having written an article about a connection between Morse’s work and the arts, it was the study of Morse’s connection between science and religion that most interested Snow, she said. She said her research on this topic gave her “a greater respect and admiration of the man.” Sarah McCroy, a junior Mathematics and Business major at Saint Mary’s, also discovered a greater respect for Morse. “Studying as a mathematician, I like to look for ways I can use my study to learn more about my faith,” McCroy said. “I look to examples, such as Morse, to understand how they use their field of study to reflect on their faith.” Sister Kathleen Dolphin, director of the Center for Spirituality, said this student reaction was the ideal outcome of the event. “Students seem to be interested in the connection between faith and reason. The Center for Spirituality’s goal is to address these questions in an academic way.” In particular, Dolphin said she wanted to help students address the current problem of science versus spirituality.last_img read more


first_imgROME – This Sunday, more than 100 Notre Dame study abroad students joined the thousands packed into St. Peter’s Square to attend the first Easter Mass presided over by Pope Francis. Bobby Weltner, a junior studying abroad in London, said he loved attending this very special Italian Mass. “Getting to see the Pope up close and to celebrate communion with people from around the world is pretty special. It’s been a phenomenal experience,” Weltner said. After the Mass, Pope Francis boarded the “pope-mobile” and shook hands with the people in the square, kissed several babies and embraced attendees confined to wheelchairs lined up along the road. Weltner said Pope Francis’s special attention to some of society’s most vulnerable awed onlookers.    “There were some really touching moments when he was driving around,” Weltner said. “He was hugging a special needs kid, and he really held that hug for a long time.” Amanda Bambury, a junior studying abroad in Paris this year, said she appreciated how much time Pope Francis took to greet the crowd. “He went around a lot trying to see as many pilgrims as he could. We were running around trying to catch the pope,” Bambury said. “It’s amazing that so many people tried to get to the square, just to go to Mass with the pope. It was great to hear people cheer, ‘Viva la Papa!’ There’s just so much love for our pope.” Regina Gilmour, a junior studying in London, said the students who participated in Campus Ministry’s Easter pilgrimage “track” in Rome over the weekend said they felt honored and lucky to participate in the special day. “It was intense,” Gilmour said. “It’s an experience you can’t have on any other trips. Notre Dame just has that connection that you wouldn’t have been able to [have] on your own.” Gilmour said doing the pilgrimage for her first visit to Rome infused the trip with a more religious spirit. “What struck me the most was you would see all these ancient Roman ruins and then also talk about how Christians had been martyred there,” Gilmour said. Junior Mary Coghlin, who is also studying in London this semester, said the Easter Sunday Mass gave her goose bumps. “It was like a dorm Mass, but in St. Peter’s Square.” Coghlin said. “It was beautiful.” Jack Trunzo, a junior studying abroad in London, said he sat in the aisles closest to the pope. He said his family received tickets from Cardinal James Michael Harvey, who is from their hometown of Milwaukee. “My archbishop connected me to the cardinal and I was able to meet him for dinner one night,” Trunzo said. “He was fantastic, he’s just kind of a normal guy. He was fluent in Italian and ordered everything for the table.” Trunzo said Cardinal Harvey spoke about his experience in the conclave that elected Pope Francis. “Every time we talked about conclave he would use the words, ‘when I was locked up.’ He said that jokingly – it was pretty funny,” he said. “He also talked about home and about Milwaukee.” Trunzo said his family sat five or six rows back from the cardinals and the altar. “We had a really unique vantage point in the shade of Saint Peter’s Basilica,” he said. “It was fantastic.”,Bobby Weltner, a junior studying abroad in London, said he loved attending this very special Italian Mass. “Getting to see the Pope up close and to celebrate communion with people from around the world is pretty special. It’s been a phenomenal experience,” Weltner said. After the Mass, Pope Francis boarded the “pope-mobile” and shook hands with the people in the square, kissed several babies and embraced attendees confined to wheelchairs lined up along the road. Weltner said Pope Francis’s special attention to some of society’s most vulnerable awed onlookers.    “There were some really touching moments when he was driving around,” Weltner said. “He was hugging a special needs kid, and he really held that hug for a long time.” Amanda Bambury, a junior studying abroad in Paris this year, said she appreciated how much time Pope Francis took to greet the crowd. “He went around a lot trying to see as many pilgrims as he could. We were running around trying to catch the pope,” Bambury said. “It’s amazing that so many people tried to get to the square, just to go to Mass with the pope. It was great to hear people cheer, ‘Viva la Papa!’ There’s just so much love for our pope.” Regina Gilmour, a junior studying in London, said the students who participated in Campus Ministry’s Easter pilgrimage “track” in Rome over the weekend said they felt honored and lucky to participate in the special day. “It was intense,” Gilmour said. “It’s an experience you can’t have on any other trips. Notre Dame just has that connection that you wouldn’t have been able to [have] on your own.” Gilmour said doing the pilgrimage for her first visit to Rome infused the trip with a more religious spirit. “What struck me the most was you would see all these ancient Roman ruins and then also talk about how Christians had been martyred there,” Gilmour said. Junior Mary Coghlin, who is also studying in London this semester, said the Easter Sunday Mass gave her goose bumps. “It was like a dorm Mass, but in St. Peter’s Square.” Coghlin said. “It was beautiful.” Jack Trunzo, a junior studying abroad in London, said he sat in the aisles closest to the pope. He said his family received tickets from Cardinal James Michael Harvey, who is from their hometown of Milwaukee. “My archbishop connected me to the cardinal and I was able to meet him for dinner one night,” Trunzo said. “He was fantastic, he’s just kind of a normal guy. He was fluent in Italian and ordered everything for the table.” Trunzo said Cardinal Harvey spoke about his experience in the conclave that elected Pope Francis. “Every time we talked about conclave he would use the words, ‘when I was locked up.’ He said that jokingly – it was pretty funny,” he said. “He also talked about home and about Milwaukee.” Trunzo said his family sat five or six rows back from the cardinals and the altar. “We had a really unique vantage point in the shade of Saint Peter’s Basilica,” he said. “It was fantastic.”last_img read more


first_imgBeginning in the fall of 2015, the College of Arts and Letters will offer a new minor in Computing and Digital Technologies (CDT), which is designed to supplement a traditional liberal arts education with technical instruction.Charles Crowell, associate professor of psychology and director of the minor, said the program will provide “more than a casual exposure to technology, which means that not only will you understand it, but you will also utilize it, and it can become a springboard for your job search and your professional activities later on.”“There’s little doubt that the world is going digital and increasingly so,” Crowell said. “People need to understand what digital technologies are and how they’re utilized.”He said the CDT minor was created on the recommendations of an advisory committee convened to review the 35-year-old Computer Applications Program (CAPP) supplementary major. Before the creation of the CDT minor, CAPP was the primary program through which Arts and Letters students gained exposure to technical training, Crowell said.“It was decided that we needed to make a few changes and what that culminated in was the creation of a new program that will, in essence, replace CAPP at the end of this academic year,” he said.A distinguishing feature of the CDT minor is the interdepartmental collaboration between the College of Engineering and the College of Arts and Letters, Duda Family Professor of Engineering Patrick Flynn said.Flynn said the minor will consist of a two-course core sequence in the programming language Python and three additional elective courses in a variety of disciplines that will build off of the material learned in the core sequence.“The idea was to provide a programming foundation to everyone in the program, so that at the end, regardless of what electives they chose, they at least have a fairly comprehensive exposure to a programming environment and the opportunity to have done some interesting things with it,” he said.Flynn, who will teach both core programming courses, said the CDT minor will provide students with technical skills that can be applied to every major and course of study.“Motivating the CDT program is a realization that computing is basically present in every discipline in one form or another,” he said.According to the website for the CDT minor, students can specialize in one of six tracks – User Interface and Experience, Cyber Safety and Security, Digital Humanities, Digital Arts, Cognitive Science and Technology Development and Management. Professor of English Matthew Wilkens, who will teach two courses in the Digital Humanities track next year, said the programming and technical knowledge taught in the CDT minor will prepare Arts and Letters students to be better scholars and prospective employees.“There’s a lot of demand for people who come out of an undergraduate program with this combination of talents — of real analytical ability, of power and effectiveness in communication and technical and quantitative analytical ability too,” he said. “That’s a really powerful combination for all kinds of things.”Tags: CAPP, CDT, Charles Crowell, College of Arts and Letters, College of Engineering, Computer Applications Program, Computing and Digital Technologies, Matthew Wilkins, Patrick Flynnlast_img read more


first_imgAlan Dowty, a faculty fellow at the Kroc Institute, addressed the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and its roots in a discussion of his new book, “Arabs and Jews in Ottoman Palestine” on Thursday. Dowty showcased his research in the Hesburgh Center for International Studies.Dowty traces the dispute back to 1882, specifically the arrival of a strange group of foreigners. Christopher Parker Alan Dowty expanded upon the arguments made in his book, “Arabs and Jews in Ottoman Palestine,” on Thursday while presenting his research in the Hesburgh Center for International Studies.“My basic thesis is that the East / West, or if you like, the European / Middle East cultural clash is at the center of this,” he said.Dowty’s thesis explores the escalation of conflict during two waves of Jewish immigration to Ottoman Palestine, called “aliya.” Dowty said the second wave saw themselves as the pioneers of Jewish Israel. Because of this, the second aliya has received most historical attention.“The second aliya was very assertive as opposed to the first aliya,” Dowty said. “They were opposed to Arab labor in the Jewish settlements, which created a great deal of conflict, and therefore, this is where it begins, so a lot of historians say.”Historical accounts from the first aliya reveal their own pattern of dispute, which undercuts the claim that these tensions began in the 20th century. Dowty argued that the reason this violence goes unexamined is because of its scale.“The first aliya clashes with Arabs did not have any bearing on political relations with the Arabs as a body,” he said.Rather than when immigrants arrived, Dowty believes the European attitude of emigrating Jews consistently motivated antagonism between Jews and Arabs, across both of the aliyas. He quoted early Zionist Eliezer Ben-Yehuda, who saw Jewish emigration as a civilizing mission, believing Arabs to be “impoverished paupers and total illiterates.”“This is positive, this gives meaning to what they’re doing,” he said. “They’re bringing civilization to a backward part of the world. [This is] what I call the benefit theory: the idea that they were bringing the benefits of Western civilization to this area of the world. This was the main rationale that Zionists adopted. Zionists were European.”The relationship between Europeans and the dying Ottoman Empire was not a friendly one, Dowty said.“Among the population, big surprise — hostility toward Europeans, going back to the crusades, which they never forgot,” he said.The Jewish immigrants, on the other hand, had no plans for assimilating, Dowty said.“This was the one place in the world where they went because they didn’t have to adjust to somebody else,” Dowty said. “They will form their own society, they will become a majority and all will be well.”For Dowty, the conflict began the moment European Jews arrived in Palestine without regard for the culture already in place. He cited several examples that support his case.“What happens with the non-European Jews, the Sephardi? People who have lived in the Ottoman empire for two generations who are culturally a part of it? Well, they were very critical of European Zionists,” Dowty said. “Two of the early settlements were of Sephardic Jews, and neither had significant problems with their neighbors.”He also discussed the German Protestant immigrant populations who were not Jewish but also faced hostility among Arabic neighbors. Together with his observations about struggles during the first aliya, Dowty believes this conflict must have began as a clash of cultures.“One of the Jewish teachers … said that the natives of the land respect no one who does not speak Arabic. And that’s generally true,” he said.Tags: Alan Dowty, Arabs and Jews in Ottoman Palestine, Hesburgh Center for International Studies, Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Kroc Institutelast_img read more


first_imgAs universities across the country opened for the first time since March, many implemented significant changes to reduce the potential spread of COVID-19 on campus. One such tool many schools developed was a COVID-19 dashboard, which aim to track coronavirus cases on a particular campus.We Rate COVID Dashboards works to evaluate just how meaningful those dashboards are. Their team of professors and students from universities across the country has rated over 200 university dashboards on a letter scale from D to A++.An ideal dashboard is easy to read, frequently updated and highlights detailed data on testing.An A++, however, seems to be an elusive score. As of now, the highest rated dashboard on the site belongs to Ohio State University, which is the only dashboard with an A+.The idea to rate university dashboards sprung from a belief that universities should be open and transparent about coronavirus cases as students return to campus said Cary Gross, professor of medicine and public health at Yale. Gross is one of the founders of We Rate COVID Dashboards, along with Dr. Howard P. Forman, professor of diagnostic radiology, public health, economics and management at Yale.However, they wanted to get diverse perspectives on the best way to evaluate dashboards, Gross said.The two turned to Twitter to gauge what the public seemed to think was most important in a dashboard. Gross said they got a large amount of feedback, including a many requests to rate particular dashboards.Gross and Forman formed a group of professors and students from universities around the country in order to gain a full perspective when rating school dashboards. From there, the website was born.Ayotomiwa Ojo, a medical student at Harvard, said she has worked with Forman for some time, and when she expressed an interest in the project, he invited her to join.“I was intrigued about thinking how comprehensive universities are being,” Ojo said. “Are they giving the whole picture?”When rating dashboards, the team tries to keep in mind three groups, comprised of those either most likely to be affected or potentially forgotten: students, faculty and staff, and the surrounding community, Gross said.“In certain towns, colleges are bringing in these students from all over the world, and it’s really important for colleges to have an understanding of what the COVID rate outside their campus walls are,” he said.The rating system then considers all of the factors these groups should know to give out a score, Ojo said. While they consider a variety of dashboard functions, she said there is always room to improve.“It’s difficult to read from a dashboard how the university is actually doing in implementing their plans,” she said. “Like, yes, we give them points if they tell how many tests are conducted, but we don’t evaluate if they are actually doing enough tests.”Regardless, Ojo said, the site is a good tool for any community member to assess the COVID situation in their area.Yet the site’s goal does not stop at simply giving out a grade. Ultimately, Gross said, they want ratings to encourage universities to revisit and improve their dashboards.This may come from peer pressure — simply seeing that other universities are doing better may push a school to revamp its dashboard. Gross said the team is also hoping state health departments will see ratings and, potentially, set a baseline criteria for university dashboards. He also cited the power that students hold in pushing for change.“We try to link the student newspapers when we rank each school,” Gross said. “Students have a lot of power, and I think students often under appreciate how much power they have within an institution. If we can engage some students to advocate from within, that’s another way to improve.”So far, their hopes are being fulfilled. Gross said some universities are reaching out to ask why they received a certain score. Forty schools have even redone their dashboards and submitted them again in hopes of improving their rating.“It’s exciting to see that some schools see our ratings and then do better,” Ojo said.Notre Dame’s own dashboard is one of 42 to earn a B+. Not the worst, but still only the fifth-highest score a university can receive.The Notre Dame dashboard, which is updated daily at noon, has been active since students arrived on campus at the start of the school year. It highlights estimates of active and recovered cases, the number of tests given and has an interactive graph of campus cases since Aug. 3.When rating Notre Dame’s dashboard, Gross said “we felt [it] was off to a good start when we rated it B+. We felt that more information about the testing strategy that ND is using to keep its students safe, as well as further information about COVID status in the surrounding community, quarantine status and overall campus COVID status would also be warranted.”Gross said the team is “looking forward to rerating the next iteration” of the University’s dashboard.His motivation behind the project stems not only from his professional connection to public health but also has a more personal connection.“I have two kids in two different colleges right now,” Gross said. “Frequently looking at our own kids’ dashboards also inspired me to start down this path. And one of their colleges is rated higher than the other — it’s become like a sibling rivalry.”Whether or not the ratings cause competition, the team does hope they will change dashboards for the better.“Our goal is not to be tongue-in-cheek and have a nice little catchy comment,” Gross said. “Our goal is to really have an impact on influencing colleges to increase the transparency of their COVID testing and mitigation efforts.”Tags: COVID-19 dashboard, dashboard rating, University of Notre Damelast_img read more


first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) MGN ImageALBANY – State leaders have partnered with private tech companies to improve the unemployment system.The New York State Department of Labor and the New York State Office of Information Technology Services announced this week a “Tech Surge” in partnership with Google Cloud, Deloitte, and Verizon to improve the reliability of the state’s online and telephone-based unemployment insurance application systems following an unprecedented spike in unemployment insurance applications related to the COVID-19 pandemic.Officials say the Tech Surge will include critical upgrades to the Department of Labor’s technology systems that will increase its capacity to accept and process applications, making it easier for New Yorkers to apply for benefits.Importantly, the Tech Surge will include a new, streamlined, and more reliable online application system – which will be available at labor.ny.gov. New Yorkers are urged to use the new online system, which can handle most applications from start to finish, dramatically reducing the number of New Yorkers who must speak to a claims specialist on the phone. In addition, the Department of Labor will roll out a new “call back” system, allowing their staff to proactively call New Yorkers who need to submit additional information to support their existing unemployment assistance application. This means New Yorkers who have already filed partial claims under the old system and had been told to call the hotline to finish their application should not — instead, the DOL call center will call these New Yorkers directly.In order to launch the new, streamlined application system, New York State’s online unemployment insurance application will go offline today between 5:00 PM and 7:00 PM to be rebooted.“I recognize that this is an extremely challenging time for all New Yorkers,” NYS Department of Labor Commissioner Roberta Reardon said. “I have been unemployed. I understand the urgency. We want you to be aware of the steps that we are taking to respond to each of you, as quickly as we can. We know that your livelihood depends on it and we assure you that you will get your benefits.”Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, the New York State Department of Labor’s unemployment insurance filing system has faced an unprecedented increase in volume — with peak weeks seeing a 16,000% increase in phone calls and a 1,600% increase in web traffic, compared to a typical week.The Department of Labor Tech Surge is providing critical upgrades to New York State’s unemployment insurance filing system during this crisis. These efforts are expected to increase capacity and reliability. Specific actions include:Google Cloud has worked with the State Office of Information Technology Services to create a more user-friendly, streamlined, and reliable unemployment insurance application for the Department of Labor. The online application will shut down from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM today to transition to this new streamlined application. Specific upgrades include:Leveraging Google Cloud’s infrastructure to increase reliability and allow the application to scale, so it can handle a high volume of users;Allowing users to save an incomplete application and pick up where they left off;Providing an “every device experience,” so New Yorkers can file from smartphones, tablets, and laptops; andStreamlining the number of questions so the application is shorter and easier to understand.Deloitte is opening an additional unemployment insurance call center staffed by hundreds of experienced customer service professionals, which will dramatically increase the number of calls that can be handled; andVerizon is expanding the number of phone “ports” for the Department of Labor’s call center from 1,750 to over 10,000 by the end of this week — increasing the center’s call capacity.The Department of Labor will begin rolling out a “call back” feature which allows state representatives to call New Yorkers with incomplete unemployment insurance applications and finish their applications over the phone. This means those who fully complete their claim online will NOT need to call the state themselves. New Yorkers who had previously been told to call the hotline should not — instead, the DOL will call them to complete their application. To prevent fraud, state representatives will verify their legitimacy by providing New Yorkers’ claim type and filing date.In addition, the Department of Labor has:Drastically expanded the call center’s hours, including opening on Saturdays and Sundays:Monday – Friday: 8:00 AM to 7:30 PMSaturday and Sunday: 7:30 AM to 8:00 PMIncreased the number of servers that support the online filing system from 4 to over 60;Implemented a new, more efficient filing system based on the first letter of the applicant’s last name (alphabetical order):A – F : MondayG – N : TuesdayO – Z : WednesdayMissed your day: Thursday through SundayStreamlined the claims process, automating additional processes and reducing the situations in which a filer has to call and speak with a representative; andDedicated 1,000 staff to the Department of Labor’s unemployment insurance Telephone Claim Center — compared to roughly 400 who typically staff the call center — with plans to bring an additional 1,200 staff on board, including those at the new Deloitte call center.Last week, the Department of Labor also launched a new PSA that provides information on how to apply for unemployment benefits and reassures New Yorkers that if their unemployment filing is delayed, they will still receive full unemployment benefits. The PSA is also available with Spanish subtitles here.In addition, earlier this week Governor Cuomo announced he had directed the Department of Labor to immediately make $600 in additional weekly unemployment benefits available to all New Yorkers. The additional benefits were included in the Federal CARES Act, but New York began delivering the extra unemployment insurance to unemployed individuals before Federal funds are disbursed to the states. New York is also extending the period covered by unemployment benefits for another 13 weeks, for a total of 39 weeks.last_img read more


first_imgMAYVILLE – Chautauqua County officials have reported 27 new positive COVID-19 cases Tuesday afternoon, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 1,214.Of the 27 new cases, six are in Jamestown, six in Fredonia, three in Dunkirk, three in Silver Creek, two in Forestville, two in Falconer, two in Frewsburg, one in Bemus Point, one in Cassadaga, and one in Sinclairville. This brings the number of active cases to 113.The Chautauqua County Health Department continues monitoring a cluster of COVID-19 cases related to social clubs in the northern end of the County. There are currently eight active cases linked to the Beaver Club in Fredonia. In addition, there have been 20 cases linked to other social clubs in the area. 19 of those cases have recovered while one case is currently active.There currently remains 21 people hospitalized. To date, there have been 1,086 recoveries and 15 deaths. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more


first_imgWNY News Now Staff Image.JAMESTOWN – AAA is partnering with the New York State Police to remind drivers of important safety tips and precautions ahead of Tuesday’s winter snowstorm.Motorists traveling in areas heavily impacted by snow are recommended to leave with extra time to make a slow and careful drive to your destination. The groups say take into consideration snow accumulation, the current snowfall rate, the wind, and visibility.Additionally, they say to stay up-to-date with the latest weather forecast before leaving.Once at the car, drivers should clean and fully remove any snow and ice before getting behind the wheel. They also say it is important to keep a full tank of gas in case you get stuck in traffic. Drivers should also keep winter clothing like gloves in their vehicle. Furthermore, a shovel, ice scraper and tow chain could also come in handy if the vehicle gets stuck.When on the roads, be sure to brake early in order to give enough time to stop if the vehicle begins to slide. Police also say look out for events farther down the road. Creating more time to react can make a difference.If you are involved in a crash, police say to stay in your vehicle and call 911. Roll your windows down a few inches or turn your vehicle off if you are stranded in snow for a period of time with your vehicle running. Covered mufflers can cause serious physical injury or death due to inhalation of carbon monoxide.Overall, they agencies say use your best judgment to determine if it is safe to hit the roads. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more


first_imgPixabay Stock ImageASHVILLE – Electrical issues are blamed for a fire in Hadley Bay on Saturday night.Fire Departments responded to 2 Hadley Bay, Rt 394 in Ashville for a residential fire just after 4 p.m.The Chautauqua County Sheriffs Office Fire Investigation Team says the fire likely started in a basement ceiling due to an electrical issue.Deputies say residents were evacuated from the building and no injuries were reported. Route 394 was closed for several hours as area fire departments extinguished the blaze. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img

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