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first_imgAngola, Kenya and Uganda came out tops in the Africa Agility photo competition. The aim of the contest was to encourage amateur and professional photographers to capture development in Africa in three categories: cities, industry, and technology. Uganda’s Mohsen Taha was named the overall winner. The Digital Age: Everyone in Uganda, from rural to urban areas, can now afford to have a cellphone. The photographer’s one-year-old son uses a mobile phone during a blackout. The photo is the winner in the technology category of the Africa Agility photo competition, as well as the overall winner. (Image: Mohsen Taha, Uganda)• Biogas backpack revolutionises cooking in Ethiopia • Maasai women lead solar revolution in Kenya• Telling our African stories • Kenyan filmmaker takes on race and women• Photo competition to showcase a positive Africa Priya PitamberThe city of Luanda in Angola, wheat fields in Kenya, and a child holding a cellphone in Uganda, were the winning images in the Africa Agility 2015 photo competition.The contest focused on capturing a modern Africa and called on amateur and professional photographers to submit images that showed the growth and development of Africa.A cash prize of $2 000 (about R27 000) was awarded to the winners in each competition category.They were: Carlos Aguiar from Angola (cities), Ahmed A Osman from Kenya (industry) and Mohsen Taha from Uganda (technology).Taha received an additional $2 000 for his photo of a boy holding a mobile phone as the overall competition winner.“I’m proud to be a part of a competition that helps to promote the economic development happening right now in Africa,” said Taha. Wheat fields in Narok embody the rapid growth of Africa’s agriculture sector, which plays a critical role in improving the lives of farmers. The image won in the industry category of the Africa Agility photo competition. (Image: Ahmed A Osman, Kenya) A city striving forward: urban developments in Luanda, Angola. The photograph won in the cities category of the Africa Agility photo competition. (Carlos Aguiar, Angola)“This competition has allowed photographers to show the various aspects of Africa and how we have grown and developed into something different, and better,” Taha said. “Six years ago, I couldn’t afford a mobile phone. Today in Uganda, everyone from rural to urban areas can afford one. These advancements are significant.”@[email protected] A BIG THANK YOU FOR THIS OPPORTUNITY YOU HAVE GIVEN US TO MAKE THIS A BETTER AFRICA— The Nikon Ambassador (@nikonambassug) September 14, 2015The competition was judged by an independent panel that consisted of Sneha Shah, the managing director of Thomson Reuters Africa; Bronwyn Nielsen, the editor-in-chief of CNBC Africa; and the renowned Ghanaian artist, Professor Ablade Glover.last_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Steve Culman, Ohio State University ExtensionTwo new factsheets summarizing key components of the work to update the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations are now available. Updated Grain Nutrient Removal RatesHow many pounds of nutrients are removed with every bushel of corn, soybean and wheat harvested? This factsheet reports new numbers and shows how nutrient removal rates in harvested grain have decreased over the past 25 years.For more information: go.osu.edu/grain. Converting Soil Test Values: Mehlich-3, Bray P, Ammonium AcetateThe updated Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations will use the Mehlich-3 extractant as the new standard for fertilizer recommendations. This factsheet provides simple, standardized conversions that allow users to convert back and forth from these different extractants.For more information: go.osu.edu/mehlich.last_img read more


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first_imgThe Rapid was launched by Skoda five years ago and albeit minor cosmetic upgrades, the car is yet to see any major changes made to it. Autocar has reported that Skoda is testing the updated facelift of the car which features both cosmetic and mechanical upgrades.The new Rapid follows the Czech carmaker’s new design philosophy which is heavily evident in other cars like the Octavia. The new Rapid will sport changes to the front fascia of the car with the hood, grille, front bumper, fenders and headlamps getting a revised design.The petrol variant of the car is not set to get mechanical upgrades, but the diesel variant however will be getting a slight bump in power due to heavy localisation and a bigger turbocharger which has also been locally sourced.The Rapid sold in the Indian market is powered by a 1.6-litre TSI petrol motor and a 1.5-litre TDI diesel motor. The updated diesel variant which will be getting a bump in power might be launched at a later date than the new facelift model of the car.last_img read more


first_imgTerry Beckner Jr. tears up as he commits to Mizzou.Five-star defensive tackle Terry Beckner Jr. is an imposing figure, standing 6-foot-4 and weighing 293 pounds. Beckner possesses an impressive physical stature but showed an equally powerful emotional side as he broke down in tears this morning before announcing his decision to sign with Missouri. Beckner hails from East St. Louis, Ill., a city that has been hit hard by poverty and crime. It’s awesome seeing how much this moment meant for Beckner and the family members that surrounded him. Good luck to the young man as he stays local.last_img


Big Ten football has been completely revamped in the past year. Nebraska joined the conference as its 12th team, the Leaders and Legends divisions were created and a new logo was released. Members of the Legends division had a lot to say during Tuesday’s spring football teleconference. New coach, new philosophy for Michigan With a new coach, a new scheme usually follows, and this is certainly the case for the Wolverines. There were two significant changes that coach Brady Hoke spoke of Tuesday afternoon. Hoke said he has had a smooth transition thus far because there are “so many great people at the university, players are eager to learn and dive into fundamentals.” “We’ve got to get better faster than everybody in the Big Ten,” Michigan defensive end Ryan Van Bergen said. Dual-threat quarterback Denard Robinson will be taking snaps from under center in the upcoming season. Hoke said Robinson was doing well moving back under center from the spread and that it helped that he had experience there from high school. Hoke added that he dealt with a similar situation while coaching at San Diego State. “He’s a guy that’s dangerous with ball, but tremendous thrower,” Hoke said. On the defensive side of the ball, the Wolverines will switch to a 4-3 scheme instead of the 3-4 it ran last season. Van Bergen said the biggest difference between Hoke and Rich Rodriguez is that Hoke “is more of a defensive-emphasis kind of coach.” He added that he felt Rodriguez had players out of position, and he likes the way Hoke has put an emphasis on both the offensive and defensive lines. As for the Ohio State-Michigan game, Hoke was pleased when he found out it would remain on the schedule and that it was the last game of the season. “It’s always played during the last Saturday of November, and that’s where it should be,” Hoke said. “There’s no bigger rivalry in sport than that game and having the game at end of the season.” Iowa excited for new Nebraska rivalry When news broke last summer that Nebraska would join the Big Ten, it meant more to Iowa than another formidable opponent within the conference. “I think most people are excited,” coach Kirk Ferentz said. “Everybody’s enthused about what Nebraska brings to the Big Ten.” It created a new rivalry game that will be up there with OSU and Michigan. Ferentz said people have been asking for a game against Nebraska for years. Linebacker Tyler Nielsen said he liked the nickname “Farmageddon” for the Iowa-Nebraska match up. Iowa’s toughest hurdles to overcome this season are replacing Ricky Stanzi at quarterback, and finding depth at the battered running back position. Quarterback James Vandenberg’s preparation impressed Ferentz, but Ferentz added that there is a short list of running backs arising in spring ball. Look for Marcus Coker to be the featured back so long as he can stay healthy. Nebraska joins Big Ten; Bo Pelini returns to alma mater The toughest challenge for any team in the Big Ten is given to Nebraska. While all other members of the conference may have to prepare for one new opponent, coach Pelini and his staff have to prepare for eight. But Pelini does not plan on overhauling his game plan. He said he was not overly concerned with changing schemes toward which it plays. “It’s more about playing good football,” he said. “It really comes down to executing your game plans to be a good football team. … I think it’s a way to measure yourself.” On Oct. 8, Pelini hosts his alma mater OSU in Lincoln. Pelini played free safety for the Buckeyes from 1987 to 1990. “Having played there and understanding the tradition and what that all entails, it’s going to be a heck of a challenge,” he said. Nebraska linebacker Sean Fisher also spoke during the teleconference, and said he was excited to move to the Big Ten. “I think it’s an extremely fortunate thing for us,” he said. “Not many people get to do this, and it gives you an opportunity to see some really cool places.” Fisher and his younger brother, Cole, a freshman at Iowa, will face off in Lincoln on Nov. 25. “Fortunately, he plays defense,” Fisher said, “so I won’t get to tackle him.” Michigan State humble After tallying a 7-1 record in the Big Ten last season, the Spartans had high expectations. Michigan State would have dominated the Legends Division, excluding Nebraska, winning it by three games against next-highest Iowa (4-4). Many favor Michigan State to win the Legends Division this season, but coach Mark Dantonio is not quite ready to accept that label. “We’re going to be in the hunt for things,” he said. “But to say we embrace the favorite, I don’t put a whole lot of stock in that.” In October alone, the Spartans face a stretch against OSU, Michigan, Wisconsin and Nebraska. “If you want to be best,” Dantonio said, “you have to play best.” Although the schedule is extremely tough, he has been very impressed by his offensive and defensive lines this spring. “The future looks bright, as bright as it ever has here, on the offensive line,” Dantonio said. “The nucleus of who we are as a football team is back.” The leader of that nucleus is quarterback Kirk Cousins, whose comments showed his humility after many questioned the ability of Michigan State to succeed in consecutive seasons. “We can’t rest on success, but work even harder. Guys who had success last season aren’t acting like they had success last season,” Cousins said. Dantonio emphasized winning on the road, minimizing turnovers and staying poised as ways to repeat there successful 2010 season. Minnesota looks to bounce back New coach Jerry Kill has a slightly tougher task than Hoke in Michigan in order to bring the team back to the top of the conference. The Golden Gophers were 2-6, placing them second to last in the Big Ten in 2010. After beginning the season 1-9, Minnesota took home two solid wins, including a 27-24 victory against Iowa. “We’re taking infant steps,” Kill said, “not baby steps.” Keeping players accountable and improving the talent pool were most important in revitalizing the program, Kill said. The big change is MarQueis Gray, a wide receiver for the Gophers last year, will be the starting quarterback. “He’s learned very well,” Kill said. “He’s a very quick learner, he doesn’t make the same mistake twice and he’s a tremendous athlete.” A bright spot for Minnesota: It does not have to face OSU for the next four seasons. “As good as Ohio State is,” Kill said, “I guess I’m pretty happy about that.” Dan Persa for Heisman Northwestern coach Pat Fitzgerald said quarterback Persa was a Heisman candidate. It is no secret Northwestern’s success revolves around Persa. Some were uncertain of his availability this season after he tore his Achilles tendon late in a 21-17 win against Iowa last year. Persa is not participating in spring football, but Fitzgerald said, “He’ll be clear to go for this fall.” Although Fitzgerald did not seem all that convincing on the phone, Persa cleared all doubts quickly. “I plan to be, at the latest, ready at the end of May,” Persa said. The key to his fast recovery, Persa said, was having surgery just three hours after the injury. Persa said he is not afraid to take off and run the ball in order to make a big play, but Fitzgerald feels he is not doing a good job protecting his body. “Part of that’s on Dan,” he said. “He’s got to get down in time; he took some unnecessary hits.” Persa remains on the sidelines, and he said he has played a coachlike role during his rehab. read more


Then-sophomore pitcher John Kuchno throws the ball during a game against Northwestern May 6, 2012, at Bill Davis Stadium. OSU won, 4-1.Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorAfter ending their last trip to Florida on a two game losing skid, Ohio State’s baseball team made sure to end their second trip on a much higher note.The Buckeyes sent three opponents packing in Orlando, Fla., this weekend at the UCF Baseball Tournament, defeating Central Florida, The Citadel and Oklahoma.“It’s huge to get the sweep and finish the weekend,” coach Greg Beals said. “We didn’t finish last weekend the way we wanted to so it was big to make a statement against three good opponents.”Against the Sooners on Sunday, freshman pitcher Zach Farmer started his second game for the Buckeyes and bounced back nicely after getting roughed up a bit last weekend.After giving up one run in the first, Farmer settled down going 5.1 innings and only allowing two hits.The Buckeyes scored three of their six runs in the fourth inning with junior outfielder Pat Porter driving in two runs and scoring the third on a wild pitch.The teams traded runs for the remainder of the game, with OSU coming out on top 6-3 after a two run eighth inning.Saturday’s game versus The Citadel was a matchup of lefties as the Buckeyes’ junior Ryan Riga took the mound against the Bulldogs’ junior James Reeves. The start was delayed three and a half hours because of heavy rain.Although The Citadel took the lead in the first inning, OSU used a four run second inning to pull itself back into the lead after RBIs from senior outfielder Tim Wetzel, sophomore infielder Troy Kuhn and two from Porter.The Citadel tied things up in the fifth inning setting the stage for freshman outfielder Ronnie Dawson.Dawson came to the plate with three men on base in the bottom of the ninth and no men out. His single to left field was enough for Kuhn to score from third, winning the game for OSU, 5-4.Kuhn said winning the first two games of the weekend was a confidence booster for the Buckeyes.“I think we gained a lot of momentum from the first two games. Just real exciting games and late finishers.” Kuhn said. “We came out on top (this weekend) and I think those first two games meant a lot.”Even though the Buckeyes won Friday’s matchup against Central Florida by six runs, the game wasn’t a blowout as the score line suggests.If not for two runs in the top of the ninth inning, OSU would have come away with a loss, but a two run single from Wetzel sent the game to extra innings, with the teams tied 3-3.After neither team scored in the 10th, 11th or 12th innings, the Buckeyes scored six in the 13th, and held Central Florida scoreless for the 9-3 victory.“The whole weekend, we grinded.” Porter said. “We never gave up. We trusted our pitchers and trusted our hitters to get it done.”The Buckeyes are next scheduled to play Friday in the Keith LeClair Classic in Greenville, N.C. First pitch is set for 1:05 p.m. read more


Pedon visits his father in hospice care following the Buckeyes’ 80-64 victory over Michigan State on Jan. 7. Credit: Courtesy of Ryan PedonRyan Pedon still remembers the exact seats he sat in for Ohio State men’s basketball games in St. John Arena with his father, mother and sister when he was growing up.Section 7A, row 14, seats 1, 2, 3 and 4.For nearly 15 years of his childhood, Pedon sat in those seats next to his father, Felix Pedon. Ryan, hired to be an assistant coach for the Buckeyes in June, remembers the time spent in that arena as well as anything else from his youth. His mind often wanders back to those seats, especially now — now that he could be close to losing his best friend.Felix has battled Lewy body dementia since his diagnosis eight years ago. At age 86, after years of watching Ryan’s games as an athlete, and now as a coach, he is nearing the end of his battle.Ryan, who departs Thursday for the Big Ten tournament in New York City, is unsure if his father will be alive when he returns.“My gut says about a week, but I don’t know,” Ryan said Tuesday. “I don’t know what to base that off of. I’m not a doctor. Just kind of watching him, looking at him in his hospice bed right now. He’s peaceful. I don’t think he’s having trouble breathing at the moment, so maybe a week or two.”On most road trips, Ryan has been able to effectively compartmentalize his feelings. He said he is always trying to balance his roles as a coach, father, husband and son.But given the health of his father, Ryan’s trip to New York for what could be several days will be different.Felix has always had a family member by his side since his diagnosis. Now that his health is beginning to fail him, Ryan might not be there at the end, something with which he has made peace.“At this point, I think I know my dad would want me to be with the team,” Ryan said, breaking down in tears. “And as much as I’d like to be there for him at the end, you put your faith in the man above and you’ve just sort of got to let the chips fall where they may. Sort of, you leave him in the Lord’s hands. I think that’s probably the best thing I could say.“I’ve got to be there with our team and hope I’m around when it happens, but if I’m not, then I know we’ll have other family that will be here.”—If there was a golden child in the family, it was Ryan, said Dean, his second-oldest half-brother. Felix was always heavily invested in sports, having played tennis until a knee operation in 2008, as well as coaching basketball, baseball and football at St. Catherine’s high school for several years.Dean said Felix knew once Ryan, his fifth son, was born, he had a future basketball player.“My dad came out and he was so proud that he had another boy,” Dean said. “He said, ‘He can dribble with both hands and he goes right to the basket.’ And that truly is how he introduced Ryan to me.”From an early age, Ryan’s parents encouraged him to play basketball — to a certain extent.  Ryan had a basketball “bigger than he was,” said his mom, Sally. He took it with him wherever he went, until his mom found it deflated in the trunk of the family station wagon one summer.Ohio State assistant coach Ryan Pedon looks onto the court during the Buckeyes’ final home game of the 2017-18 regular season on Feb. 20, 2018. Ohio State won 79-56. Credit: Edward Sutelan | Assistant Sports EditorWhile Sally expressed concern that her son was becoming too “one-dimensional,” Felix encouraged the habit, building a basketball hoop in the backyard above the garage and frequently playing with Ryan. He even put lights around it so Ryan could continue playing until midnight, often keeping the neighbors awake.When they couldn’t play in the backyard, they went to a local community center.Ryan and his dad were so close, Ryan made him the best man at his wedding in 2010. It was, as Felix shuffled down the aisle, that the family doctor — who was a friend and neighbor in attendance at the wedding — noticed what he believed to be symptoms of Parkinson’s.His disease was originally diagnosed as a form of Parkinsonism, Sally said, but around a year later was identified as Lewy body dementia after Felix underwent multiple tests at Ohio State.“I didn’t know a lot about Lewy body, and I certainly did a little bit of research, but it was something that we found out would be a gradual, you know, sort of a gradual progression,” Ryan said.Given that it is a slow-moving disease and his dad still seemed to be in relatively fine condition — though he began to lose motor skills — the family felt fortunate in some respects. “I don’t want to make it seem like in 2010 it was a death sentence either, because it wasn’t,” Ryan said. “The last eight years, it was probably a blessing that we could see it coming a little bit, too, as opposed to — when it’s a loved one, I think we’re all different with how we respond to death of loved ones. Everybody’s different, but I know our family, we were appreciative that we were able to say our goodbyes and sort of see it coming.”—For a while, most of the Pedon family was away from Columbus. Four of the five sons lived out of state, as did Ryan’s sister, Amy. However, Ryan was hired to join head coach Chris Holtmann’s staff at Ohio State in the summer, bringing him back home to his father.Men’s basketball assistant coach Ryan Pedon sits with his father, Felix Pedon in the Schottenstein Center during a family visit in 2017. Credit: Courtesy of Ryan PedonHaving grown up the son of a Buckeye fan and raised as one, Ryan felt pride at the chance to be able to tell his father that he would be coaching at Ohio State. It had always been a dream of the Pedon family for Ryan to be able to return to Columbus. The dream, unfortunately, was met with a morbid moment.“When I told him I was coming to Ohio State — I’m sorry I’m getting choked up a little bit here,” Ryan said, “But he said, the night I told him I was coming to Ohio State, he said, ‘I can die a happy man.’”Shortly after being hired, Ryan took his parents and his high school basketball coach on a tour of the Schottenstein Center. The group ventured throughout the arena, seeing where the shoes are kept in the locker room, the coaches’ offices and the court with empty seats.Sally said Felix was so proud and that it felt like a dream come true for him to receive a tour of the Buckeyes’ home arena by his son — one of the coaches.Felix was in better shape during the tour of the arena, but as the season neared, his health declined. Ryan said he is unsure if his dad was even able to comprehend or fully watch a game with Ryan as an Ohio State coach on TV given his current mental state.“The saddest thing is he was looking forward to — that was his goal in rehab this fall was to get better and stronger so he could go to that [Nov. 5 matchup against Wooster],” Sally said. “It was sad that he did not get to make that game or any this season.”Ryan visits his dad as frequently as he can. Often, he goes by himself when he can find the time. Whether it’s on the way home from games, before a road trip or just some free time, Ryan tries to spend time with his dad whenever possible.“It’s been pretty cool to be able to go, and with the season we’ve had and go there and tell him that, ‘Dad, we just beat the No. 1 team in the country. We beat Michigan State,’” Ryan said. “You go after games, and sometimes I’ll go real early in the morning. Sometimes I’ll go real late at night. But I just go and sit there and just talk to him.”Ryan has not opened up about his father’s disease much with his fellow coaches. In fact, Holtmann said he asks Ryan about his father more often than Ryan brings him up. Holtmann said he knows Ryan has gone through a lot and encourages him to take time off should he need it.“He needs to know he has my blessing to do that and more than anything, I’m encouraging him to do that, if that’s what he feels like he needs,” Holtmann said. “But he also may feel like, hey, like he told me, ‘My dad would want me to be doing this.’”Even with Ryan having said it has been nice to have the eight years with his father rather than an unexpected loss, Ryan will be losing the person he calls his father, his role model, his best friend.Sally, who has spent countless hours watching the two play pickup basketball outside and going with them to play golf, knows it will be hard on Ryan. It will be hard on everyone in the family. “I’m proud of my kid,” Sally said. “It’s the end of an era. Ryan and his dad have been the closest of all the children.”When he steps onto the team bus that will take him to the airport to board a plane for New York City on Thursday, Ryan won’t know for certain whether he will see his father alive again.But he will forever see his father in his memories, always in that same row, always in the same seats. read more


Ohio State’s redshirt senior Blake Leeson anticipates to block a George Mason attempt at the game against on Jan. 18 at St. John Arena in Columbus. Credit: Ethan Clewell | Senior Reporter.In a near identical match to Thursday’s five-set thriller, the Ohio State men’s volleyball team closed out the regular season, and its tenure at St. John Arena, downing Ball State in five sets, 19-25, 25-17, 15-25, 25-23 and 15-9. The Buckeyes (10-18, 5-9 MIVA) tallied 6.5 blocks and 21 kills to win the final two sets in a comeback victory despite being both out-blocked 10 to 8.5 and out-killed 51 to 50  by the Cardinals (15-13, 6-7 MIVA). In both matches on Thursday and Saturday, Ohio State fell in the first and third sets, setting up a fourth-and-fifth-set comeback. Head coach Pete Hanson said the Buckeyes’ early struggles have a lot to do with team confidence. “Once we’ve kind of let the jitters die down or let our anxieties flow away because we’re getting tired, then we settle in,” Hanson said. “We’re trying to do too much too early.” With Ball State holding a 13-12 lead in the first set, senior middle blocker Parker Swartz struck a kill and two aces, extending the Cardinals’ advantage to four. Despite an ace by Ohio State senior setter Sanil Thomas and kills by redshirt senior middle blocker Blake Leeson and freshman outside hitter Sean Ryan, Ball State used kills by Swartz and junior outside attacker Matt Szews, as well as Ohio State errors to hold the Buckeyes off in the first set, 25-19. Swartz finished with a team-high four aces, adding nine kills, two digs and three block assists. Junior outside hitter Blake Reardon led the Cardinals with 14 kills, also contributing an ace, two digs and three block assists. Down two sets to one, Ohio State stormed back in the fourth set. After falling behind 9-4 early, the Buckeyes exploded for scoring runs of three and five points, including an ace by freshman middle blocker Ethan Talley, kills by sophomore opposite hitter Jake Hanes and junior outside hitter Reese Devilbiss and two blocks, taking a 15-12 lead. Despite a late surge by Ball State, Ohio State held the Cardinals’ attack at bay, holding onto a two-point lead en route to a 25-23 fourth set victory, ensuring a fifth and final set. Devilbiss ended with 14 kills, a dig and four block assists. Hanes led the Buckeyes with 19 kills and two aces, adding three digs and three block assists. His two aces came as part of a five-ace second set, establishing a foundation for the Buckeyes’ comeback victory three sets later. Ohio State brought its fourth-set momentum into the fifth set, using a five-point run to take a 10-5 lead from three Ball State attack errors and two blocks featuring Devilbiss, Talley and Thomas. Kills by Reardon and junior middle blocker Lemuel Turner helped the Cardinals cut into Ohio State’s lead, but three kills by Hanes, Leeson and redshirt sophomore outside hitter Tyler Alter snuffed out the comeback attempt, leaving the Buckeyes victorious in the fifth set, 15-9, and the match, 3-2. Leeson, a senior who played in his final regular season match for the Buckeyes Saturday night, said this was a special win for him. “I’m just so proud of the guys and to go out and put [St. John Arena] to bed with a win against a team that usually gives us a lot of trouble was a great feeling,” Leeson said. “I wouldn’t have it any other way.” Ohio State will return to action in the MIVA tournament Saturday against No. 10 Loyola Chicago in Chicago. read more


first_imgNapoli captain Marek Hamsik has confirmed that he turned down a life-changing offer to go to China in favour of remaining at the club after some persuasion by new head coach Carlo AncelottiThe Slovakian midfielder had been strongly linked with a move to the Far East in the summer and appeared set at one point to complete a €30m transfer.Hamsik revealed last week that he had set himself a deadline of July 9 to make a final decision on his future.“It wasn’t the first time this possibility existed. Let’s say it would’ve set my family up for life,” he said.“I gave myself a date of July 9, the date of our training camp, and that if nothing had happened by then, I’d have let it go.”Maurizio Sarri, JuventusMaurizio Sarri satisfied despite Juventus’ draw at Fiorentina Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Maurizio Sarri was satisfied with Juventus’ performance on Saturday afternoon after finishing a tough game at Fiorentina 0-0.And now it turns out that Ancelotti was behind Hamsik’s u-turn on China with the Italian coach set to play him as a deep-lying playmaker for the new season.“He called me many times when I was in Slovakia and told me that he wanted me in the team,” Hamsik explained to Sky, via Football-Italia.“I was happy with that, and also to have stayed. Going to China would have changed my life, I won’t hide that and I said publicly that I’d have liked to go. I’m happy to keep wearing this shirt though.”Hamsik has made 501 appearances for Napoli in all competitions and has scored 120 goals with 110 assists.last_img read more

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